Work experience survey update

We’re very grateful to everyone who’s taken the time to take part in our work experience survey. We’ve had 21 responses so far, 13 of which from City University postgraduate journalism students. The respondents included students on the Investigative Journalism, Science Journalism, Broadcast Journalism, International Journalism, Political Journalism and Newspaper Journalism MA programmes. This isn’t quite enough to be taken as a representative sample of our cohort of circa 250 students, but it does give us an unscientific straw-poll snapshot. The figures and charts below should be taken in that context.

The strongest point of agreement was that of our 13 City respondents, 85% said they thought more could be done to ensure work placements are worthwhile for students and employers.

70% said they were rarely or never paid for their work. Only one person said they were paid most of the time, and nobody said they were always paid. A third said they were never reimbursed for travel expenses incurred during the working day, and only a quarter said this always happened. 77% said they were never or rarely reimbursed for getting to and from their place of work. 69% were never or rarely reimbursed for meal expenses, and only one said this always happened.

77% said they were at least sometimes asked to work more than 40 hours a week and 31% of the total said this happened always or most of the time75% said they had been asked to work antisocial hours on work placements.

Only 31% said they were rarely or never asked to do menial work. One person said this happened most of the time and another said it always happened.

31% said they were only sometimes thanked for their work. 30% said they rarely received constructive feedback. 46% said staff only sometimes took time to give them instruction and advice.

30% said they never or rarely received sufficient induction, and a further 23% said this only sometimes happened.

You can see the figures in full in the pie charts or by downloading the data for yourself.

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Charts

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